Shower stalls

By Erik Dolson

A sailboat is a world of small spaces. If the boat doesn’t have a water maker, fresh water is precious and saved mostly for drinking and cooking and (efficiently) washing dishes. Showers are further down the list, so sailors often shower on shore if a nearby marina has facilities.

Taking a shower in a marina has challenges. Here are a few tips.

First, give up any idea you want to be “presentable in public” while walking up the dock. You are on your way to the shower, and that’s how you look. Continue reading Shower stalls

Sailing is about Trust

by Jane Miller

Sailing  is about trust.

Who to trust. When to trust. How much to trust. What to do if that trust is broken.

Close to one year ago, we left the dock in Victoria bound for Sidney on the eastern side of Vancouver Island. Off the dock, out the harbor, southeast along the Strait of Juan de Fuca,  and a short jaunt up the east coast.

That was the plan. Continue reading Sailing is about Trust

Sinking Spell

Jane Miller

Dr. Lin said we’d give it one more month. One more month of careful observation. One more month of weekly self-injecting methotrexate with its life-sucking side effects. One more month of painful (but brief) bi-weekly Humira.

If the inflammation goes away, we’ll continue without the injection of steroids into my left eye. If the fluid is still there, well, we’ll continue and do the shot. Again. Continue reading Sinking Spell

Who’s blind?

By Erik Dolson

We were back on the boat at the end of December, planning for a New Years celebration in Victoria. The fireworks had been cancelled, or were never scheduled, but we didn’t know that and didn’t really care. We were on the boat and with friends.

Irish’ last doctor’s visit had been great. Her left eye had improved after the injection of steroid. (I held her hand, but could not watch.) While it was impossible to know if the methotrexate was effective, signs were positive even if her vision wasn’t improving much past 20/30, even with the new glasses we bought her last summer. Continue reading Who’s blind?

Erik Wrote a Book

by Jane Miller

Erik wrote a book.

This is not a surprise. He’s written a number of books.

A nonfiction book about adult attachment disorder. A story about a couple who meet on the ferry. A mystery. And now he has rewritten a book he wrote under the pen name “Jessica Love.”

Writing anything and showing it to the world takes courage, perseverance, determination, and not a little chutzpah. Erik has taken these a step further and added self-awareness, pride, and honesty to the list.

The first “Jessica” book was good. A well-written whodunit with amazing sex scenes. But he was honest with himself and realized he could do better. There was a slightly different story that needed to be told and he was ready to bring it to life. Continue reading Erik Wrote a Book

On Becoming an Advocate

by Jane Miller

                                                                               

Whoever wrote the definition of “advocate” didn’t know the half of it. I mean, “to speak or write in favor of; support or urge by argument; recommend publicly,” does not even begin to describe this past week in Washington, DC.

I am exhausted beyond words. The insomnia that dogs me nightly is worse when I travel. It has been like that for as long as I can remember, no matter how many times I have flown for work. The insomnia that sits up with me when Erik is not in bed comes along, too. The insomnia that comes from Parkinson’s, fibromyalgia, and sleeping on titanium refuses to be outdone. A powerful triumvirate, these three insomnias. Continue reading On Becoming an Advocate

Push

By Erik Dolson

I have been asked to participate in a forum on Parkinson’s in Washington, D.C. next month,” Irish said one morning in February. “They want us to talk with members of Congress.”

“That’s wonderful. You’d be great. I think you should,” I replied.

“They’re willing to pay travel expenses for me and a caregiver. Want to go?”

“Um, no. A hotel room for five days isn’t …”

“Three days, we travel there on Sunday and back on Thursday…” Continue reading Push

How Do You Know?

Jane Miller

The medicine I take six times a day loses efficacy when taken too close to a meal high in protein, so an early dinner of salmon meant a slight delay in drugs. That meant my right toes, foot, and leg cramped up so tightly it was impossible to walk.

Cramps also attack when I don’t move enough or often enough. Like after a three-hour car trip. Or when I don’t take my usual walks. My right arm and hand stiffen so that I can’t write and can barely type.

One of the first symptoms of  Parkinson’s – we didn’t even know – was losing my ability to tell stories or explain, well, anything. Laura noticed. I noticed but didn’t understand. Erik can tell where I am in my medicine schedule by how long it takes me to finish a sentence and how many pronouns I use.

Imagine that. An English teacher, writer, editor, and program manager who can’t explain, describe, or express herself clearly. Losing what was my life for almost 35 years. Continue reading How Do You Know?